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Racial Disparity in Autism Therapy?

Are Children of Ethic Background Denied Access to Autism Therapy?

Parents are charging that their children are slipping through the cracks when it comes to autism treatment.

Advocates are taking action to increase autism therapy and services for Blacks and Latinos.  Fighting for the right to access to the best autism therapy for children afflicted with autism spectrum disorders.

In this nations health care system it is general knowledge that the health care quality you recieve is directly proportionate to the amount of money you can pay for it.

A_black_mother_and_child,_Chicago._-_NARA_-_556145

Are ethnics denied access to autism therapy? A black mother and child Chicago. NARA 556145

If you have insurance you are welcome at the clinic. If you don’t it’s cash upfront or you have to make arrangments and you can be turned away.

Do you think there is a possibility of disparity in diagnosing autism and providing treatment for autistic children of ethic families too?

Saeed Shabazz a staff writer for FinalCall gives us his opinion and backs it up with facts.

“I did not know the word ‘Autism.’ They kept telling me at the beginning of his formative years about Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and saying I should put him on medication which I did not do,” Ms. Alexander told The Final Call…

“If a Black child twitches in a chair, they say he has ADHD. The problem is there is very little culturally-aware literature or programming available for Black and Latino parents who have an Autistic child,” said Jay Coleman, a District of Columbia school teacher with a Masters in Special Education, specializing in emotional and behavioral disorders.

“The system will use your ignorance against you,” Mr. Coleman continued. The bottom line is access to resources, Mr. Coleman said, adding, “That is why it is important to emphasize the need for the right literature for Black and Latino parents.” He has put together a grassroots entity SlickFish LLC, available online at www.slickfish.org and on Facebook, SlickFish Education and Therapy.

Doreen Hodges, executive director of Family Voices of the District of Columbia, Inc., told The Final Call there are 16,032 children in the District of Columbia diagnosed with special health care needs from A to Z: “However, we find most of the Black and Latino boys are diagnosed as having ADHD.”

“White children are diagnosed as early as 18 months; but for most of our families the children are normally diagnosed at eight- or nine-years-old,” explained Ms. Hodges.

“Later interventions result in a poorer developmental outcome that can have a lasting impact on the child’s and the family’s quality of life,” notes Dr. Martell Teasley, associate professor at the Florida State University at Tallahassee College of Social Work. “No one is advocating for African American children nationally; it is widely known that our children are getting the later diagnosis for autism,” he told The Final Call.

The report put forth some valid arguements that need to be addressed.

This report comes out on the heels of the governments likely passage of a bill to provide first class coverage to government employees under Tricare coverage.

Tell us your view on autism service and diagnosis disparity in ethnic minorities.

One Response to Racial Disparity in Autism Therapy?

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